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Jun
18
94

Phish - 1994

UIC Pavilion, University of Illinois
Chicago, IL, US

Set List

Show Notes

This was Phish’s 1st show at the UIC Pavilion – a college arena with a capacity of 8,500. The show was promoted by Jam Productions. All Things Reconsidered from soundcheck was played to a How Many More Times Beat. This reminded the band of of How Many More Times which they proceeded to cover with a bit of a Led Zeppelin medley at the end. Soundcheck ended with More Than I Can Say (Leo Sayer cover) from soundcheck which was dedicated by Trey to Shooter, the band bus driver. Deadheads claim a so-called “Mind Left Body”Jam (Grateful Dead cover based on Paul Kantner/Grace Slick’s song “Your Mind Has Left Your Body” in the midst of the intro to David Bowie. David Bowie also contained teases of Three Blind Mice, Dave’s Energy Guide, Voodoo Child (Slight Return) and Purple Haze teases. You Enjoy Myself included teases of Frankenstein and How Many More Times as well as a vocal jam based on Monty Python’s Spam (mashed up with We’re Off To See The Wizard) and Point Me In The Direction Of Albuquerque. Chalk Dust Torture included a How Many More Times jam. Before this show the band was interviewed by Danny Bonaduce (from The Partridge Family) on his show which aired live on The Loop 97.9-FM Chicago where they jokingly performed Point Me In The Direction Of Albuquerque as well as Sweet Adeline and Dog Faced Boy. This show and the next UIC Pavilion show on 11/25/94 were was released as an archival JEMP Records 6-CD box set and LivePhish.com Download entitled “Chicago ’94″ in July 2012. The Chicago ’94 release includes All Things Reconsidered, How Many More Times and Poor Heart from the 6/18/94 soundcheck. After this show, Fish visited a private jam session with the guys from local band Citrus including Mark “Murph” Murphy (from Citrus) on bass, Pete Herr on percussion and Michael Bizar on guitar along with Scott Bilstad who played drums in addition to Fish. They played late into the night including Impressions (John Coltrane cover), Whipping Post and the Sanford and Son Theme.